The Center for Association Resources

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Is an association management firm focused on helping Non-Profit associations succeed in their mission.

A New Way to Think About Why Members Join

Another in a series of articles related to association management selected from our reading list by:
Robert O. Patterson, JD
CEO/ Principal
The Center for Association Resources, Inc.

From Smooth the Path:

Over and over we hear that professional development and networking are the top reasons members join any association. Here’s another way to think about why members join. They are searching. Here are some of the things they are searching for: Read More

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Filed under: Center for Association Resources, Fund Raising, Leadership, Marketing, Non-Profit, Planning

Are Members Getting Value or are They Satisfied?

Another in a series of articles related to association management selected from our reading list by:
Robert O. Patterson, JD
CEO/ Principal
The Center for Association Resources, Inc.

From Smooth the Path:

Our members get value from different offerings the association has at different times in their career. Our members may get value from benefits or from experiences or from ideas or conversations. Value is fluid. And members tend to get more value the more involved they are. If we were to field a survey to the membership a new member may say I’m satisfied and a long time engaged member may also say I’m satisfied. But those two answers do not mean the same thing.How Can a Nonprofit Define Campaign Success that Donors and Advocates will Understand? Read More

Filed under: Center for Association Resources, Leadership, Marketing, Non-Profit, Strategic Planning

Accentuate the positive

Another in a series of articles related to association management selected from our reading list by:
Robert O. Patterson, JD
CEO/ Principal
The Center for Association Resources, Inc.

From SmartBlog on Leadership

How do you motivate yourself?

That’s a question I sometimes get and when I do I like to give a three-word answer: Accentuate the positive! It’s the title of a Harold Arlen-Johnny Mercer tune from the 1940s. Also consider the maxim that legendary basketball coach John Wooden used to preach: “Do not let what you cannot do interfere with what you can do.”

That simple statement offers such clarity. So often we sabotage ourselves by thinking negatively. We may posit a lofty intention and then we de-loft it when we weigh the obstacles in our path.

Indeed the biggest obstacle may not be a boss or a circumstance — it is ourselves. And so we kill our motivational motor just as it begins to turn over.

Instead, learn to “accentuate the positive.” Read More

Filed under: Center for Association Resources, Leadership, Non-Profit, Planning

How Nonprofits Should Define Success

Another in a series of articles related to association management selected from our reading list by:
Robert O. Patterson, JD
CEO/ Principal
The Center for Association Resources, Inc.

From Care2:

Nonprofits work on some of the toughest issues facing the world, ranging from ending poverty to reversing the environmental effects related to climate change. While nonprofits may not be able to solve these problems in our lifetime, we must be able to show impact and show degrees of success with our advocates and donors. We also need to engage the public at-large on these critical issues and illustrate how we are moving the needle.
How Can a Nonprofit Define Campaign Success that Donors and Advocates will Understand? Read More

Filed under: Center for Association Resources, Fund Raising, Leadership, Non-Profit, Strategic Planning

10 ways to keep fundraising on track

Another in a series of articles related to association management selected from our reading list by:
Robert O. Patterson, JD
CEO/ Principal
The Center for Association Resources, Inc.

From NonProfit Times:

Fundraising is a duty that comes with with a considerable workload and it is sometimes difficult to gauge whether one is heading in the right direction while operating in a pressure cooker.
Give your donors what they want. Referred to as donor-focused or relationship fundraising, donors need to receive what they want when they want and how they want it in order for a strong, long-term relationship to be forged. Usually, this coincides or can coincide with what the organization wants. Read More

Filed under: Fund Raising, Leadership, Non-Profit, Planning

Brave Leadership

Another in a series of articles related to association management selected from our reading list by:
Robert O. Patterson, JD
CEO/ Principal
The Center for Association Resources, Inc.

From Great Leadership:

Widely. For some bravery could mean facing a tough personnel decision or making investment decisions to enter a new market. And while those decisions can often be brave, I contend that the highest form of bravery in an organizational context is keeping at bay the opposite of bravery; fear. In our business organizations fear has a growing influence. This can be seen in our capital allocation decisions, how we react to competitors and how engaged our employees are in the mission of the organization that you are leading. To be a truly great leader you must tackle the three primary areas that fear can influence your organization and prevent your business from realizing increased returns and long-term value creation. Read More

Filed under: Center for Association Resources, Leadership, Non-Profit, Planning

The one trait successful leaders share

Another in a series of articles related to association management selected from our reading list by:
Robert O. Patterson, JD
CEO/ Principal
The Center for Association Resources, Inc.

From Smart Blog on Leadership:

More and more studies show that confidence is a critical trait in leaders, a quality that draws people in and adds weight to everything you say. It’s not only important to be right, you must also be confident. Yet sometimes it seems like confidence is either something you have, or something you don’t. Read More

Filed under: Center for Association Resources, Leadership, Non-Profit

Opportunities Missed From Too Many Fundraising Channels

Another in a series of articles related to association management selected from our reading list by:
Robert O. Patterson, JD
CEO/ Principal
The Center for Association Resources, Inc.

From The NonProfit Times:

Most fundraisers (68 percent) use four or more channels to engage constituents, and the most popular engagement channels are email (86 percent), website (72 percent) and in-person events (71 percent) and direct mail (68 percent).
While most nonprofits use multiple channels to engage their supporters, there still are missed opportunities when it comes to online fundraising and the time it takes to acknowledge donations. Some 60 percent of organizations have only one online fundraising page or no fundraising page at all and 76 percent of organizations take 72 hours or more to acknowledge a donation. Read More

Filed under: Center for Association Resources, Leadership, Non-Profit, Planning, Strategy

A Mega-Investor’s 6 Best Marketing Tips for Social Businesses and Nonprofits

Another in a series of articles related to association management selected from our reading list by:
Robert O. Patterson, JD
CEO/ Principal
The Center for Association Resources, Inc.

From Entrepreneur:

A major challenge for any business is finding the best and most effective ways to market itself. When your business is mission-driven, whether that be through a social business, non-profit status or otherwise, there is the added complexity of not only educating potential customers on services and products, but also the purpose and the drive behind the organization. Read More

Filed under: Center for Association Resources, Leadership, Marketing, Non-Profit

Want Good Governance? Teach Hard Skills in Nonprofit Advocacy

Another in a series of articles related to association management selected from our reading list by:
Robert O. Patterson, JD
CEO/ Principal
The Center for Association Resources, Inc.

From NonProfit Quarterly:

In “Reframing Governance II,” David Renz makes the point that some of the most powerful decisions affecting the communities and mission work of nonprofits are made at levels outside the purview of the board. Rather, they are made at the network level and often involve advocacy. So, do you and your board know how to deconstruct your state’s budget, or about the legal parameters about lobbying and campaigning in your state? These skills and knowledge bases should be required for many nonprofits because it allows them more influence over the policymaking and money flows that in many cases define how their missions can be actuated, but few funders and capacity-builders promote them as core competencies. Read More

Filed under: Center for Association Resources, Leadership, Non-Profit, Planning, Strategy

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