The Center for Association Resources

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Is an association management firm focused on helping Non-Profit associations succeed in their mission.

Common sense is not common

Another in a series of articles related to association management selected from our reading list by:
Robert O. Patterson, JD
CEO/ Principal
The Center for Association Resources, Inc.

From SmartBlog on Leadership:

What do your leaders celebrate in your workplace? Take a moment and write down the five to 10 things that leaders measure, praise, encourage, recognize, or reward on a regular basis.
Don’t look at service awards or other annual recognition that are given out. Note down the day-to-day messages that team members hear.
Next, categorize these messages, rewards, and praisings. Note which rewards are about results, performance and money, and which rewards are about cooperative interaction, citizenship and kindness.Read More

Filed under: Center for Association Resources, Leadership, Non-Profit, Strategic Planning

Boarding Call for Next-Gen Leaders

Another in a series of articles related to association management selected from our reading list by:
Robert O. Patterson, JD
CEO/ Principal
The Center for Association Resources, Inc.

From Innovation:

A quick search of “millennials on nonprofit boards” yields more than 67,000 search results on Google. Most of the articles that turn up emphasize the value of millennial leadership, and include calls to engage and involve them in the social sector. But reality lags far behind interest and intentions. One large, national survey in 2012 showed that only 2 percent of board members were under 30, while 43 percent were between 50 and 64. Meanwhile, 70 percent of millennials spent at least an hour volunteering last year, and 84 percent made a charitable donation. More than other living generations, the millennial generation is focused on making a difference, being hands-on, and pursuing what it loves. Data like this makes it clear that millennials care about the state of the world and want to get involved—so why do so few boards have young members?Read More

Filed under: Leadership, Non-Profit

A new study finds a key component of effective leadership is surprisingly simple

Another in a series of articles related to association management selected from our reading list by:
Robert O. Patterson, JD
CEO/ Principal
The Center for Association Resources, Inc.

From Business Insider:

Typically, when we envision successful leaders, we think of people who are charismatic, who know how to take control of a room, and who are comfortable in positions of power.

In fact, research suggests that extroversion is generally a strong predictor of successful leadership.

Yet a new analysis of 25 studies, led by Dana Joseph, Ph.D., at the University of Central Florida, complicates the idea that simply being outgoing is enough to make you an outstanding leader. Now, researchers say that positivity is key: Generally happy people make better leaders.

The analysis zeroed in on the relationship between trait positivity (or the general tendency to respond positively to situations) and several leadership criteria, including leadership effectiveness.Read More

Filed under: Center for Association Resources, Leadership, Non-Profit, Planning

5 Strategy Questions Every Leader Should Make Time For

Another in a series of articles related to association management selected from our reading list by:
Robert O. Patterson, JD
CEO/ Principal
The Center for Association Resources, Inc.

From Harvard Business Review

Have you ever noticed that when you ask someone in your company, “How are you?” they are more likely to answer “Busy!” than “Very well, thank you”? That is because the norm in most companies is that you are supposed to be very busy – or otherwise at least pretend to be – because otherwise you can’t be all that important. The answers “I am not up to much” and “I have some time on my hands, actually” are not going to do much for your internal status and career.
However, that you are very busy all the time is actually a bit of problem when you are in charge of your company or unit’s strategy, and responsible for organizing it. Because it means that you don’t have much time to think and reflect. And thinking is in fact quite an important activity when it comes to assessing and developing a strategy.
The CEO of a large, global bank once told me: “It is very easy for someone in my position to be very busy all the time. There is always another meeting you really have to attend, and you can fly somewhere else pretty much every other day. However, I feel that that is not what I am paid to do. It is my job to carefully think about our strategy.”Read More

Filed under: Center for Association Resources, Leadership, Marketing, Non-Profit, Strategic Planning

Maximizing the Value You Deliver to Members

Another in a series of articles related to association management selected from our reading list by:
Robert O. Patterson, JD
CEO/ Principal
The Center for Association Resources, Inc.

From Membership Marketing Blog:

Delivering products and services to members involves choices. How much of your budget, staff time, and promotional efforts should go into any given product or service? What products and services attract new members and help to keep them? Understanding this defines value.

One method to help make these decisions is to ask members and staff to rate offerings through two questions. How important is a given product or service? And how well does the organization deliver these offerings? Read More

Filed under: Center for Association Resources, Non-Profit, Planning, Strategy

Make Advocacy a Part of Every Board Member’s Duty

Another in a series of articles related to association management selected from our reading list by:
Robert O. Patterson, JD
CEO/ Principal
The Center for Association Resources, Inc.

From The NonProfit Times:

Advocacy is essential to nonprofit work — but it’s not always seen as a crucial part of serving on a nonprofit board.

That view is changing, however, especially now that BoardSource, the organization that many nonprofits turn to for advice on governance, has put advocacy on its list of 10 basic responsibilities of nonprofit boards. Read More

Filed under: Center for Association Resources, Leadership, Non-Profit, Planning

The 3-step process for creating better habits across your team

Another in a series of articles related to association management selected from our reading list by:
Robert O. Patterson, JD
CEO/ Principal
The Center for Association Resources, Inc.

From SmartBlog on Leadership:

As a leader, it’s your job to ensure you’re always pushing your employees to form positive workplace habits. But like any ingrained routine, it takes more than motivation for it to truly sink in. Even the most promising change can fizz out if it’s not repeated on a daily basis.

According to international business speaker and author Michael Kerr, successful people tend to thrive on routine and consistent habits. Of course, you can’t force your employees to adopt a habit, but by finding the right work pattern and reinforcing it daily, you’ll build a culture that’s driven by consistency. And as a result, you’ll foster a more productive workplace. Read More

Filed under: Center for Association Resources, Leadership, Non-Profit, Planning

Economic Impact: A New Approach for Proving Outcomes

Another in a series of articles related to association management selected from our reading list by:
Robert O. Patterson, JD
CEO/ Principal
The Center for Association Resources, Inc.

From Stanford Social Innovation Review

Impact. Defining it is often difficult. Measuring it can be harder yet. And the final step—communicating impact—remains a formidable challenge for many organizations.

Even in the midst of a climate primed for moderate economic growth, success in the nonprofit sector is elusive. Supporters, donors, and funding organizations comprise a limited pool of financial sustenance, which nonprofits of all shapes and sizes must continuously vie for with their messages to affirm the worthiness of their missions.

It’s a competition rife with nuance and largely decided by how substantially nonprofits can prove the mission-focused impact of their work. For decades, they have relied on two dimensions—efficiency and effectiveness—to define and frame their success. But these approaches are limiting and in some cases even detrimental when proving outcomes.

Luckily, nonprofits can supplement the shortcomings of these traditional means. There’s a more dynamic and tangible third dimension through which nonprofits can define, measure, and communicate their success: economic impact.Read More

Filed under: Center for Association Resources, Marketing, Non-Profit, Strategic Planning

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